Today's postings

  1. [Baren 37708] Re: Exchange 38 info. attn Vizra & Pereira! ("M Pereira")
  2. [Baren 37709] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints (Lana Lambert)
  3. [Baren 37710] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints (eli griggs)
  4. [Baren 37711] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints (Barbara Mason)
  5. [Baren 37712] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints (Barbara Mason)
  6. [Baren 37713] Re: "A Vegetarian Night Before Christmas" (Sharri LaPierre)
  7. [Baren 37714] Re: "A Vegetarian Night Before Christmas" (Barbara Mason)
  8. [Baren 37715] The use of medium (Graham Scholes)
  9. [Baren 37716] exchange 38 going out Tuesday (ArtSpotiB # aol.com)
  10. [Baren 37717] Re: The use of medium ( slinders # comcast.net)
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Message 1
From: "M Pereira"
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 13:35:16 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37708] Re: Exchange 38 info. attn Vizra & Pereira!
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Hi Benny
glad you found it.
Thank you .
murilo
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Message 2
From: Lana Lambert
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 14:40:29 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37709] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints
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Has anyone tried mounting prints to canvas for display? I followed the link to the Cannonball Press Show but I couldn't figure out their process. I'm having a show coming up in July and I'm trying to do several large scale woodblock prints. I normally frame things under mat and glass for display but for some of these I want people to be able to go up and see the raw fiber of the print like one would a painting on canvas. Would one laminate the print onto a canvas with binders paste? Would it be better to just dry stretch the print onto the canvas? Would a gessoed canvas or raw duck linen work better? I don't think it would be a good idea to stretch a print onto a plain stretcher frame as poke holes would just be too easy. Also, would the print begin to fuzz up and wear over the years like this? Just wondering if anyone has had experience. Otherwise, I'll just jump right in with experiments of my own! :)

-Lana
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Message 3
From: eli griggs
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 15:00:06 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37710] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints
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I don't know how you would do this but it seems to me
that adhering the print to canvas so the texture of
the canvas shows through would be very destructive to
the artwork.

How about keeping the print under glass and mount a
piece of the same paper, with a few 'blocks' of ink
printed onto it under or beside the print with the
invitation to the viewer to touch/examine it at their
pleasure? Easy to do, easy to replace.

I'd hate to see you go through the process of mounting
a print like you describe, only to have some putz with
chocolate on her hands ruin it.

Just my 2,
Eli
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Message 4
From: Barbara Mason
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 15:04:10 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37711] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints
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Lana,
I think you can do this with mat medium, but why not print directly on the fabric?

I have mounted a lot of prints to wood panels using Yes paste as I did not want any mat medium on the surface of the print. I thinned the paste with water to the consistency of Karo syrup, then brushed it out on the wood or masonite panel until it did not bead up but stayed smooth. Then I laid the print down and rolled it out from the center with a rubber brayer and turned it over to dry over night with a weight on the back of the panel. In the morning I trimmed the edges of the paper off with a razor blade. I then protected the print with a layer of cold wax. Apply it with cheese cloth and buff it up like a litho. It takes a few days to dry. If you add solvent to the wax it will take a lot longer to dry as solvent slows down the time. If you do a large piece, say over 30 inches, you might need to do one end and then the other to keep the paste wet long enough to work with it. My largest one was 42x24 and I did it in two parts, pasting one end and then
the other. I have had some that have been done this way on my wall for 3 years and no deterioration or de-laminating. The wax does slightly deepen the grays of tone on the print.

Fabric is harder because the paper and fabric do not give at the same rate, that is paper might de-laminate due to the difference in expansion and flexibility of the fabric. If you gesso the fabric first I think it might work a lot better as it should make it more stable.

Why not contact the cannonball press and ask them how they did it? Most printmakers will tell you anything you want to know. It is one of the best things about printmaking, no one keeps secrets, everyone seems happy to share technical information.
My best
Barbara
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Message 5
From: Barbara Mason
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 16:11:36 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37712] Re: Cannonball Press Show/ stretched canvas prints
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Lana,
I had another thought on this. When I was younger (a long time ago) I was heavily into decoupage for a few years. One of the things I learned was that you can take almost any image and coat it with mat medium, let it dry and then carefully rub the paper off the back. This leaves the ink on the medium but removes most of the paper. If you then carefully glue this to fabric with mat medium you will have a flexible substrate for your print. Of course this does not let one see the paper but I know from experience that this will work. You coat the fabric with medium, lay your thin film with the inked image on it face down on wax paper and then roll it onto the fabric mat medium sides together, Roll out with a brayer to get rid of any bubbles.
My best
Barbara
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Message 6
From: Sharri LaPierre
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 19:50:09 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37713] Re: "A Vegetarian Night Before Christmas"
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Barbara,
That was wonderful. Who cares if it was woodblock or not - it was
much enjoyed. Thank you!

(I guess you made it home from Seattle unscathed - I've wondered about
you all week, but my dialing finger has been busy knitting!) How did
your hanga workshop with acyrlics go? Or am I remembering
incorrectly? (There! I managed to get something woodblock into this
message.) ;-)

We have over a foot of snow here with an inch of ice on top of it, and
icicles 3' long, no kidding! It is truly a winter wonderland, unless
of course, you want to go someplace. Who can get out of their
driveway? I hear the tow truck drivers are getting $100 per mile. I
wonder if my Prius can be rigged up as a tow truck.....alas, I think
not.

Thanks again, Dave, for the great poem. I enjoy it anew each year.

Happy Holidays to all,
Sharri
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Message 7
From: Barbara Mason
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2008 22:24:45 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37714] Re: "A Vegetarian Night Before Christmas"
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Sharri,
They rescheduled the class for March when the bad weather hit. It was worse here than Seattle that weekend but still really bad on Sunday both places. I was glad to be home safe and sound.
We have a foot of snow as well, measured by Lee who goes out in this stuff but has not driven in a couple of days as it is higher than the car wheels. Just a little exaggeration.
My best to all
Barbara




>(I guess you made it home from Seattle unscathed - I've wondered about you all week, but my dialing finger has been busy knitting!) How did your hanga workshop with acyrlics go? Or am I remembering incorrectly? (There! I managed to get something woodblock into this message.) ;-)
>
>Happy Holidays to all,
>Sharri
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Message 8
From: Graham Scholes
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2008 01:23:38 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37715] The use of medium
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Added to this....

You can use the method Barbara described on a drawing.
Suppose one day you did a drawing on newsprint and it turned out to be
a masterpiece....

>I had another thought on this. When I was younger (a long time ago)
> I was heavily into decoupage for a few years. One of the things I
> learned was that you can take almost any image and coat it with mat
> medium, let it dry and then carefully rub the paper off the back.
> This leaves the ink on the medium but removes most of the paper. If
> you then carefully glue this to fabric with mat medium you will have
> a flexible substrate for your print. Of course this does not let one
> see the paper but I know from experience that this will work. You
> coat the fabric with medium, lay your thin film with the inked image
> on it face down on wax paper and then roll it onto the fabric mat
> medium sides together, Roll out with a brayer to get rid of any
> bubbles.
> My best
> Barbara
>
>
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Message 9
From: ArtSpotiB # aol.com
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2008 03:55:48 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37716] exchange 38 going out Tuesday
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Hello Friends.

It's done and ready to be taken to the PO. Yes, your Exchange 38 is complete,
with colophon attached to the outside of some packages, inside others (due to
regulations). Andrew, I have not forgotten that yours is to be "on hold".

Hope that each one of you finds joy in your holidays.

ArtSpot Out
BA in studio



"It is neither wealth nor splendor, but tranquility and
occupation, which give happiness."
--Thomas Jefferson
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Message 10
From: slinders # comcast.net
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2008 04:22:59 GMT
Subject: [Baren 37717] Re: The use of medium
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--or you can Xerox transfer it onto 'good paper' or fabric,
using honest-to-goodness ink! This is a wonderful way to 'save'
a drawing like this! ...or to get prints onto your fabric.

This method is described in the archives. Using this method,
you can have the Xerox machine increase the size of your drawing
or print, if it suits your purpose.

Stay warm and safe, and enjoy this Christmas Season!
Sharen