Today's postings

  1. [Baren 38001] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks (AEleen Frisch)
  2. [Baren 38002] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks (eli griggs)
  3. [Baren 38003] Re: New Baren Digest (HTML) V46 #4690 (Jan 29, 2009) (Marilynn Smith)
  4. [Baren 38004] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks (Sharri LaPierre)
  5. [Baren 38005] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks (Charles Morgan)
  6. [Baren 38006] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks ("Ellen Shipley")
  7. [Baren 38007] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks (Graham Scholes)
  8. [Baren 38008] Re: New Baren Digest (HTML) V46 #4690 (Jan 29, 2009) ("Louise Cass")
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Message 1
From: AEleen Frisch
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 15:05:38 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38001] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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Andrew,

Rainy weather does make it soooo much easier. I've never had a harder
time than last summer on Cape Cod in 90degree dry weather. Sounds like
you had a positive and productive experience all in all. I'm looking
forward to seeing your prints.

AEleen

PS: I know what you mean about the Year of the Ox, too. I have finished
my design for that but it is waiting for Exchange 39 for me as well. :-)
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Message 2
From: eli griggs
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 15:22:50 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38002] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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One thing you can do to use the entirety of a quality
block is mate a piece or pieces of lesser wood, in
this case, lesser meaning less good for carving or
less expensive, with a common woodworkers tool, a
plate biscuit joiner. In case you're not familiar
with plate-joiners, these work by the cutting of
matching oval pocket slots into the edges of the wood
and 'biscuits' of compressed wood are glued and
pressed into place, the length of the joined edge is
glued and the board is clamped together until the
water-based glue cures, about 24 hours.

Done properly, the joint is very tight, strong and and
the joined piece will be flush with the surface of the
face of the block, ready to accept the kento.

There are some precautions to keep in mind in using
biscuits, one being that it is possible for the wood
on either side of a large biscuit may bulge slightly
from a biscuit swelling, but my experience has been
this does not happen in hardwoods such as cherry or
maple at or over 3/4 inches in thickness and, of
course, you can use smaller biscuits to help avoid any
such problem.

The better tools allow you to adjust how far up or
down in edge you place the pocket so that can be of
help as well.

You also must be aware not to carve too deeply over a
biscuit, so take into account the design when placing
pockets.
Perhaps more importantly to some carvers here, you can
join smaller blocks of wood very efficiently to
make-up larger blocks for carving.

Here is a page that gives some more basic info on
these tools. I personally use a Ryobi Detail Joiner
and the larger Porter Cable tool and can say without
reservation, they are great pieces of equipment.

Cheers

http://www.builderssquare.com/xbg_Biscuit_Plate_Joiners_Buying_Guide_92.aspx
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Message 3
From: Marilynn Smith
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 17:29:12 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38003] Re: New Baren Digest (HTML) V46 #4690 (Jan 29, 2009)
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Ahhh a toast to all Bareners. I am celebrating the resolution of too
wet paper. I dampened differently, less water than I usually use and
today my paper was ultra perfect. Guess I didn't need advice I needed
to vent and rethink my approach. What a challenge water based
printing can be. There are so many variables that when you finally
get it right you know you have really learned something. I know with
every new project I discover one more thing that makes everything work
better. At least this years prints are being done with a baren and
not a press, I did not forget to pack my nice ball bearing baren this
year! The big difference, I think , between water based press run and
water based baren run is that with a baren you can adjust the pressure
you exert more easily, it is a touch and feel thing. With an etching
press you can only go so far with that pressure. It does make a
difference, at least I think it does.

One other thing I have learned, I work outside the parameters, I like
the unusual. It is interesting to note the different approaches and
personalities out there. Some have everything lade out, their plates
firmly square, their surfaces sanded very smooth, their designs
perfected before carving. I salute your ordered minds. I just can't
do that. I see an image in something and want to go, not labor over
it. I see an unusual shaped piece of wood and some interesting
surface texture and I want to print it. I will say that knowing the
right amount of water to use makes a huge difference. When exerting
pressure on my plate I can get a tad of embossing, but not pigment in
my cut out areas and I know it is not to wet. If the color is strong
and that happens I know it is not too dry. But I do know that I need
not put on quite that much pressure so I can let up a bit and have a
decent print.

I never did comment about the oil and water thingy. I had this water
based, simple little print that was printing blotchy. Mike tried to
help me solve the problem, and we were both puzzled. Than I recalled
that the plate had been very dry when I started to carve, so I oiled
it with linseed oil. Apparently that was causing the problem. I am
sure those of you using mineral oil are right, that it can be used
successfully with water based pigments. So, that said I would not
recommend oiling your block with linseed oil.

Hope everyone is have great success printing.
Marilynn
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Message 4
From: Sharri LaPierre
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 18:37:53 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38004] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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Andrew,

I had the same problem with the tiny 1/2" border I left for myself,
not because the wood was too small, but because I thought I would be
smart one day and cut all the paper to the size required for the
portfolio, but forgot to adapt the drawing I had done to be smaller
than that size. If I weren't such a cheapskate I would have cut more
paper, but that is not my nature. So, I have persevered and despite
my best efforts, there are some smudges on the borders. I have now
convinced myself that this will show that the artist was indeed a
human - this is not a machine doing this job. And, if the smudges
bother anyone, they can trim the borders. The only thing all this
thinking does for me to to completely absolve myself of any stupidity,
brain-gaps, lack of technical expertise, etc. and I can merrily go
about guilt free and ready to make my next million mistakes!

Cheers ~
Sharri
(who is still printing)
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Message 5
From: Charles Morgan
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:06:34 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38005] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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Ahhhh, Sharri ....

ALL of my prints are actually digital. And to fool everyone, I have programmed my computer to put random smudges on the margins ....

Cheers ...... Charles
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Message 6
From: "Ellen Shipley"
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 21:13:02 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38006] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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>The only thing all this
thinking does for me to to completely absolve myself of any stupidity,
brain-gaps, lack of technical expertise, etc. and I can merrily go
about guilt free and ready to make my next million mistakes!<

Love it! ;- ]

Ellen


-(>-----~
Ellen Shipley
Trompt As Writ
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Message 7
From: Graham Scholes
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 22:29:26 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38007] Re: Exchange #39 prints finished; next time use bigger margins/blocks
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Sharri LaPierre wrote:

> and I can merrily go about guilt free and ready to make my next
> million mistakes!

Well thatís good Sharri.... A mistake is evidence that someone is
doing something.

Graham
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Message 8
From: "Louise Cass"
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 04:20:58 GMT
Subject: [Baren 38008] Re: New Baren Digest (HTML) V46 #4690 (Jan 29, 2009)
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Marilynn - a light coating of linseed oild well rubbed into the surface of
(any type of) wood block before cutting is fine for water based inks (
rolled on) as well as nori and whatever pigment is used for moku hanga - I
believe Maria Arango originally suggested it - I always oil the surface and
don't have any problems - I imagine if too much is applied it wouldn't be
good just as having paper too wet or too much paste etc present
problems....it seems to me that mineral oil is much heavier than linseed?
but then I've never tried it...
Louise C.