Today's postings

  1. [Baren 40362] Re: 20th Century Woodblock and Linocut Artists ("Mark Mason")
  2. [Baren 40363] Re: Charles' New Year's cards ("Nancy O")
  3. [Baren 40364] Re: Charles' New Year's cards (Charles Morgan)
  4. [Baren 40365] Re: 20th Century Woodblock and Linocut Artists (David Bull)
  5. [Baren 40366] Baren Member blogs: Update Notification (Blog Manager)
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Message 1
From: "Mark Mason"
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 2010 15:39:32 GMT
Subject: [Baren 40362] Re: 20th Century Woodblock and Linocut Artists
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Here's a really nice collection of work I've never seen before by a lot of
amazing artists, most of which I've never heard of.

In Quick Search, select Prints and also Arts and Crafts, and you should get
25 pages of results with clickable images to enlarge.



In the 'New Items' there are also some other prints including one by
Morley-Fletcher.



I couldn't afford to buy any of these, but thanks to the Internet, we can
get to glimpse these great prints.



I was astonished by the watercolour quality of some of the linocuts. The
mastery of technique to get results like that is breathtaking.



Enjoy!



http://www.paramourfinearts.com/



.and Happy New Year to all.



Charles, your rat crossed the pond to the UK this morning. Many thanks.
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Message 2
From: "Nancy O"
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 2010 17:00:19 GMT
Subject: [Baren 40363] Re: Charles' New Year's cards
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Charles...great idea the way you did all three..thank you!

Nancy O
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Message 3
From: Charles Morgan
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 2010 17:15:34 GMT
Subject: [Baren 40364] Re: Charles' New Year's cards
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Thanks, Nancy. I am determined to do the whole Oriental Zodiac as puzzle blocks in that theme. I started these exchanges with Year of the Sheep, and the last three make 7 in the series. Now, if I can just keep up ......

Cheers ....... Charles
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Message 4
From: David Bull
Date: Thu, 07 Jan 2010 23:16:09 GMT
Subject: [Baren 40365] Re: 20th Century Woodblock and Linocut Artists
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Mark wrote:
> Hereís a really nice collection of work Iíve never seen before by a
> lot of amazing artists, most of which Iíve never heard of.
>

Fabulous! More more! The list of early 20th century woodcutters just
grows and grows ... Is anybody keeping track of all this stuff that is
turning up recently?

Sigh ...

Dave

Digest Appendix

Postings made on [Baren] members' blogs
over the past 24 hours ...

Subject: World Upside Down
Posted by: Annie B

WhiteDancers

In the late 1500s there was a race going on among the European powers to establish settlements in the new world. Spain was way ahead, with a strong presence in Central and South America, and England was severely behind with no settlements at all. Between 1584 and 1590, English aristocrat Sir Walter Raleigh sponsored a series of exploratory voyages to the coast of "Virginia" (now called North Carolina) to drum up support for a colony among British investors. Raleigh sent an artist named John White on five of those journeys to "drawe to life" the area's natural features and inhabitants.

The watercolors that White produced detailed, among other things, the native Algonquian peoples -- their ceremonies, villages, meals and modes of dress. His paintings gave England its first glimpse of America and his work to this day remains vital for colonial scholars.

For the next layer of my "10 Little 9 Little Indians" print, I referenced a figure from the John White painting of dancing Indians at the top of this post. Here's the figure upright. I added a few feathers to the arms.

I then repeated the figure, arranging them in a circular pattern to echo the circular dance arrangement in the White painting, then turned the pattern of Indians upside down for my print. Here's the result after I printed the block.

WorldUpsidedown

For those of you who are interested in such things, this block was tough to print. Because of the amount of space between the figures, I felt I needed to ink each one individually, then lay down the paper and carefully burnish them with the baren one by one. There are 14 separate figures, so this inking and burnishing was very slow. It took me most of the day to do a run of 35 prints (I'm running 5 test sheets at the front of a run of 30 prints). Here's a shot of the block being inked and the neat little surikomi bake (brush) I used.

InkingTheIndians

This item is taken from the blog Woodblock Dreams.
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Subject: Carving Press Block
Posted by: Ellen Shipley



Pencil sketch on block, 4"x6".



Starting to carve. This is really scary. I've never attempted to carve face detail this tiny before. I figured I should start with it tho in case I screw it up and have to start over with a new block. I'm going to leave it alone for awhile now. Don't want to press my luck.


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This item is taken from the blog pressing-issues.
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Subject: Winter Dawn

This was inspired by a digital photo I took through the window of the winter dawn. Later I used the photo as a guide to make this three block woodcut. This is a photo of the print (not a scan) as I had it pinned to the refrigerator so I could study it. Therefore there are distortions in the "squareness" of it. And since this is the first proof, there is a registration problem at the top as the board used for the warm colors was a hair larger and is showing over the top edge of the black tree shapes. The wood blocks are cherry and the paper is kitakata. Inks used were oil based.

I don't know when I've enjoyed making a woodcut as much as this one. I won't be able to do a regular edition of it because the underlying warm tones were applied in a variegated roll with a brayer onto an uncarved board. Each print I make will be different. But the idea of that excites me!

© 2010 Gayle Wohlken


[This was a summary of the original entry. The full entry can be viewed here]

This item is taken from the blog Gayle's Woodblock Blog.
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